Wild Edible Foods

Being a vegnut, I have been learning about the wild edible foods here in Colorado.  This year I discovered edible wild foods right in my own backyard.  For years I’ve been tirelessly pulling out these “weeds” and then I discovered that they are truly amazing little nutritional gems.  Wild foods are often more nutritious than some of our grocery store greens.

Now I am protecting my “weeds” from being eradicated from my yard.  My spouse now knows not to touch the purslane, dandelions, lambs quarters, mallow or plantains growing in the garden.  I enjoy harvesting these little gems every couple of days to add to my morning smoothies, salads, and veggie wraps. 

Dandelion

Dandelion

Dandelion is a very rich source of beta-carotene which we convert into vitamin A. This flowering plant is also rich in vitamin C, fiber, potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, zinc, and phosphorus. It is a good place to get B complex vitamins, trace minerals, organic sodium, and even vitamin D. Dandelion contains protein too.  Avoid dandelions where weed killer or fertilizers have been sprayed.

Purslane

Purslane

Purslane contain surprisingly more omega-3 fatty acids (α-linolenic acid) than any other leafy vegetable plant. 100 grams of fresh purslane leaves provide about 350 mg of α-linolenic acid.  They are loaded with Vitamin A, iron, magnesium, calcium and some B-complex vitamins.  These little nutrient powerhouses are mild tasting and they grow profusely all over my garden.

Lambs Quarter

Lambs Quarter

Lambs Quarters are very high in Vitamin K, vitamins A and C, riboflavin, calcium, manganese, and they have all the amino acids to form a complete protein.  This superfood, aka weed, is delicious sauteed, in smoothies and salads.

Malva

Malva

Malva or Mallow is often used in teas for throat, bronchial inflammation and to calm the digestive system.  It is also used for skin irritations such as bug bites, eczema and dry skin.  I find the plant in my garden has a deep root that requires a bit of effort to pull out.  Or just pick the leaves and infuse in water as a tea, or add to a smoothie or salad.

 

I hope you will be inspired to learn more about the benefits of wild edible foods that grow in backyards and gardens.  It is empowering to learn about plants and what they are so you can decide whether or not to keep them in your yard.  I know there are thousands of plants that can be toxic and so being aware of which plants are good and those that are not is a good thing for you and your family.

 

 

Dandelion is a very rich source of beta-carotene which we convert into vitamin A. This flowering plant is also rich in vitamin C, fiber, potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, zinc, and phosphorus. It is a good place to get B complex vitamins, trace minerals, organic sodium, and even vitamin D. Dandelion contains protein too, more than spinach. It has been eaten for thousands of years and used to treat anemia, scurvy, skin problems, blood disorders, and depression. – See more at: http://www.sunwarrior.com/news/11-health-benefits-of-dandelion-and-dandelion-root/#sthash.ZOoNr4Ii.dpuf
Dandelion is a very rich source of beta-carotene which we convert into vitamin A. This flowering plant is also rich in vitamin C, fiber, potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, zinc, and phosphorus. It is a good place to get B complex vitamins, trace minerals, organic sodium, and even vitamin D. Dandelion contains protein too, more than spinach. It has been eaten for thousands of years and used to treat anemia, scurvy, skin problems, blood disorders, and depression. – See more at: http://www.sunwarrior.com/news/11-health-benefits-of-dandelion-and-dandelion-root/#sthash.ZOoNr4Ii.dpuf
Dandelion is a very rich source of beta-carotene which we convert into vitamin A. This flowering plant is also rich in vitamin C, fiber, potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, zinc, and phosphorus. It is a good place to get B complex vitamins, trace minerals, organic sodium, and even vitamin D. Dandelion contains protein too, more than spinach. It has been eaten for thousands of years and used to treat anemia, scurvy, skin problems, blood disorders, and depression. – See more at: http://www.sunwarrior.com/news/11-health-benefits-of-dandelion-and-dandelion-root/#sthash.ZOoNr4Ii.dpuoin me as I learn about the many wonders, nutrition, harvesting and preparing of wild edible foods.

For another article on Edible Wild Foods click here.

References:

http://www.sunwarrior.com/news/11-health-benefits-of-dandelion-and-dandelion-root/
http://voices.yahoo.com/the-natural-health-benefits-malva-6682724.html
http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/purslane.html

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s